Discussion:
Dr Ian Paisley sworn of the Privy Council
(too old to reply)
Michael Rhodes
2005-11-16 17:06:56 UTC
Permalink
From the Court Circular, Times, Nov 16: "The Rt Hon and Most Reverend
John Tucker Mugabi Sentamu, Dr Ian Paisley MP, Dame Heather Hallett,
Sir Alan Moses, Sir Stephen Richards and Sir Nicholas Wilson were sworn
in as members of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council."

According to the late lamented Patrick Lichfield Her Majesty gives a
sensational impersonation of Dr Paisley...



***
Regencypanther
2005-11-16 22:00:30 UTC
Permalink
Where can you find a complete list of the present Privy Council as well
as those in the past? I am just curious to see who is on it.
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-16 23:15:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Regencypanther
Where can you find a complete list of the present Privy Council as well
as those in the past? I am just curious to see who is on it.
I can email you a full current list if you like.

MAR
Regencypanther
2005-11-16 23:22:53 UTC
Permalink
That would be awesome!!
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-16 23:46:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Regencypanther
That would be awesome!!
I have contacted you off-list.

There are currently 528 Privy Counsellors, plus the Queen. The
Conservatives still comprise the largest bloc, at 143 members, although
Labour has nearly closed the gap (at 141 members, including those
appointed as Labour MPs but no long members of the Labour party). The
largest non-UK bloc is that of New Zealand, with 34 members.

There are also two ex-Privy Counsellors (Aitken and Profumo) as well as
9 suriving members of the Northern Irish Privy Council, the last
appointment to which was in 1973. The last member of the Irish Privy
Council was Lord Rathcavan, who died in 1982.

MAR
Peter Tilman
2005-11-16 23:44:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Regencypanther
Where can you find a complete list of the present Privy Council as well
as those in the past? I am just curious to see who is on it.
Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page (http://www.angeltowns.com/town/peerage/) has a
historical list from 1679 to 2003:

http://www.angeltowns.com/town/peerage/02PrivyCouncils--UK.htm

(Leigh's site also has Irish, Northern Irish and Canadian Privy Councils.)

The Privy Council Office itself has a current list, though it doesn't seem
to have been updated with the very latest members:

http://www.privycouncil.gov.uk/output/Page76.asp
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-16 23:49:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Tilman
The Privy Council Office itself has a current list, though it doesn't seem
http://www.privycouncil.gov.uk/output/Page76.asp
The last time I examined this list (about a year ago) it contained a
number of inaccuracies, for instance UK members who had died but whose
names had not been removed. It may have been cleansed since.

MAR
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-16 23:57:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@btinternet.com
Post by Peter Tilman
The Privy Council Office itself has a current list, though it doesn't seem
http://www.privycouncil.gov.uk/output/Page76.asp
The last time I examined this list (about a year ago) it contained a
number of inaccuracies, for instance UK members who had died but whose
names had not been removed. It may have been cleansed since.
Nope - it contains silly errors. For example, the current Archbishop
of York, sworn yesterday, being listed as "Mugabi, Rev John".

Lord Whitty, appointed on 12 October 2005, is absent.

Sir Menzies Campbell is missing his knighthood.

Sir David Croom-Johnson died as long ago as November 2000

How embarrassing...
Peter Tilman
2005-11-16 23:59:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@btinternet.com
Post by m***@btinternet.com
Post by Peter Tilman
The Privy Council Office itself has a current list, though it doesn't seem
http://www.privycouncil.gov.uk/output/Page76.asp
The last time I examined this list (about a year ago) it contained a
number of inaccuracies, for instance UK members who had died but whose
names had not been removed. It may have been cleansed since.
Nope - it contains silly errors. For example, the current Archbishop
of York, sworn yesterday, being listed as "Mugabi, Rev John".
Lord Whitty, appointed on 12 October 2005, is absent.
Sir Menzies Campbell is missing his knighthood.
Sir David Croom-Johnson died as long ago as November 2000
How embarrassing...
An inaccurate document produced by the British Government? Surely not...
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-17 00:01:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Tilman
An inaccurate document produced by the British Government? Surely not...
Hoo'd of thunk it?!
C-Man
2005-11-17 04:56:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Tilman
Post by Regencypanther
Where can you find a complete list of the present Privy Council as well
as those in the past? I am just curious to see who is on it.
Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page (http://www.angeltowns.com/town/peerage/) has a
http://www.angeltowns.com/town/peerage/02PrivyCouncils--UK.htm
(Leigh's site also has Irish, Northern Irish and Canadian Privy Councils.)
The Privy Council Office itself has a current list, though it doesn't seem
http://www.privycouncil.gov.uk/output/Page76.asp
The Canadian List
http://www.pco-bcp.gc.ca/default.asp?Language=E&Page=InformationResources&Sub=PrivyCouncilMembers&doc=PCMembers1867-1910_e.htm
Don Aitken
2005-11-17 11:59:29 UTC
Permalink
On 16 Nov 2005 14:00:30 -0800, "Regencypanther"
Post by Regencypanther
Where can you find a complete list of the present Privy Council as well
as those in the past? I am just curious to see who is on it.
Several people have posted sources for this, but here is a quick note
on who gets to be PC:

All cabinet ministers must be members. This accounts for the great
majority.

Membership is sometimes given to ministers outside the cabinet.

It is given, fairly rarely, as a special honour to politicians outside
the government, including the leaders of minor parties in the HoC
(this is the one which accounts for Paisley).

And, even more rarely, to prominent non-politicians, such as Sir Angus
Ogilvy.

Some offices (Lord Mayors of London and York, Lord Provost of
Edinburgh, Archbishops of Canterbury and York, Lords Justices of
Appeal) carry an automatic PC.

Senior judges from countries which allow appeals to the Judicial
Committee are appointed to allow them to sit on the committee. They
are nominated by their own governments.

Appointment is for life, or until removed. Removal, which is very
rare, may be on advice or at the member's own request.

The *active* membership is confined to current cabinet ministers. The
others get their chance once per reign, at the Accession Council.
--
Don Aitken
Mail to the From: address is not read.
To email me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com"
Peter Tilman
2005-11-17 12:30:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Aitken
On 16 Nov 2005 14:00:30 -0800, "Regencypanther"
Some offices (Lord Mayors of London and York, Lord Provost of
Edinburgh, Archbishops of Canterbury and York, Lords Justices of
Appeal) carry an automatic PC.
Not the Lord Mayors and Lord Provost. They are styled "The Rt Hon. The Lord
Mayor/Provost of X" whilst in office, but aren't members of the Privy
Council.
Gary Holtzman
2005-11-17 12:58:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Aitken
All cabinet ministers must be members. This accounts for the great
majority.
Membership is sometimes given to ministers outside the cabinet.
It is given, fairly rarely, as a special honour to politicians outside
the government, including the leaders of minor parties in the HoC
(this is the one which accounts for Paisley).
What about the Leader of the Opposition and the leader of the Lib. Dems.? Are
they always PCs? They're the Right Honourable.
--
Gary Holtzman

Change "macnospam.com" to "mac.com" to email.

-------------------- http://NewsReader.Com/ --------------------
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-17 13:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary Holtzman
Post by Don Aitken
All cabinet ministers must be members. This accounts for the great
majority.
Membership is sometimes given to ministers outside the cabinet.
It is given, fairly rarely, as a special honour to politicians outside
the government, including the leaders of minor parties in the HoC
(this is the one which accounts for Paisley).
What about the Leader of the Opposition and the leader of the Lib. Dems.? Are
they always PCs? They're the Right Honourable.
You're right, along with the Anglican Archbishops (and the Bishop of
London), the parliamentary leaders of the two main opposition parties
are also by convention (there is nothing automatic about it in a legal
sense) admitted to the Privy Council. As noted, the style of Rt Hon is
used by other persons (e.g. Peers of the degree of Earl and below, and
their wives and widows, various Lord Mayors & Provosts) but as such
does not indicate membership of the Council.

MAR
Louis Epstein
2005-11-19 23:49:02 UTC
Permalink
***@btinternet.com wrote:
:
: Gary Holtzman wrote:
:> Don Aitken <don-***@freeuk.com> wrote:>
:> > All cabinet ministers must be members. This accounts for the great
:> > majority.
:> >
:> > Membership is sometimes given to ministers outside the cabinet.
:> >
:> > It is given, fairly rarely, as a special honour to politicians outside
:> > the government, including the leaders of minor parties in the HoC
:> > (this is the one which accounts for Paisley).
:>
:> What about the Leader of the Opposition and the leader of the Lib. Dems.? Are
:> they always PCs? They're the Right Honourable.
:
:
: You're right, along with the Anglican Archbishops (and the Bishop of
: London), the parliamentary leaders of the two main opposition parties
: are also by convention (there is nothing automatic about it in a legal
: sense) admitted to the Privy Council. As noted, the style of Rt Hon is
: used by other persons (e.g. Peers of the degree of Earl and below, and
: their wives and widows, various Lord Mayors & Provosts) but as such
: does not indicate membership of the Council.
:
: MAR

The Attorney General is not in the Cabinet but is a PC as a rule
(more consistently than the various Ministers of State who get it);
perhaps the legal advice he gives the Cabinet is believed to be best
delivered "on Privy Council terms"?

Is the Secretary of the Cabinet a PC?

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-19 23:59:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Louis Epstein
Is the Secretary of the Cabinet a PC?
Neither the present Cabinet Secretary, Sir Gus O'Donnell, nor his
predecessor, Sir Andrew Turnbull, are Privy Counsellors.

MAR

Don Aitken
2005-11-17 14:28:15 UTC
Permalink
On 17 Nov 2005 12:58:34 GMT, (Gary Holtzman)
Post by Gary Holtzman
Post by Don Aitken
All cabinet ministers must be members. This accounts for the great
majority.
Membership is sometimes given to ministers outside the cabinet.
It is given, fairly rarely, as a special honour to politicians outside
the government, including the leaders of minor parties in the HoC
(this is the one which accounts for Paisley).
What about the Leader of the Opposition and the leader of the Lib. Dems.? Are
they always PCs? They're the Right Honourable.
Yes. The L of O has been given it, I think, since that office got
statutory recognition in 1937 (although it is rare for one not to have
it already, as an ex-cabinet minister). Liberal leaders, once they
dwindled to a third party, usually got it too, but they sometimes had
to wait some time; five years in the case of Jo Grimond (leader 1956,
PC 1961). Recent Lib. Dem. leaders seem to have got it shortly after
election.
--
Don Aitken
Mail to the From: address is not read.
To email me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com"
David Boothroyd
2005-11-17 19:01:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Aitken
On 17 Nov 2005 12:58:34 GMT, (Gary Holtzman)
Post by Gary Holtzman
What about the Leader of the Opposition and the leader of the Lib. Dems.?
Are they always PCs? They're the Right Honourable.
Yes. The L of O has been given it, I think, since that office got
statutory recognition in 1937 (although it is rare for one not to have
it already, as an ex-cabinet minister). Liberal leaders, once they
dwindled to a third party, usually got it too, but they sometimes had
to wait some time; five years in the case of Jo Grimond (leader 1956,
PC 1961). Recent Lib. Dem. leaders seem to have got it shortly after
election.
The reason for this is that opposition party leaders are often given
briefings on matters of national security, and it helps maintain the
secrecy if they are arranged through the Privy Council. Senior
opposition figures are also likewise given membership if they do not
already have it; most of the top offices of state in the incoming
Labour government in 1997 were held by Privy Counsellors, partly so
they could be briefed on the machinery of government before being
pitched into it for real.

The leaders of the other significant minor parties now get membership
if they need it.
--
http://www.election.demon.co.uk
"We can also agree that Saddam Hussein most certainly has chemical and biolog-
ical weapons and is working towards a nuclear capability. The dossier contains
confirmation of information that we either knew or most certainly should have
been willing to assume." - Menzies Campbell, 24th September 2002.
Graham Truesdale
2005-11-18 23:47:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Aitken
Yes. The L of O has been given it, I think, since that office got
statutory recognition in 1937 (although it is rare for one not to have
it already, as an ex-cabinet minister).
The next L of O will be Davis or Cameron
The current one is Howard
Previously Duncan-Smith
Previously Hague
Previously (briefly) Major
Previously Blair
Previously Smith
Previously Kinnock
Previously Foot

How many of those nine had/have/will have Cabinet experience while
LoO?
Don Aitken
2005-11-19 01:56:35 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 18 Nov 2005 23:47:38 +0000 (UTC), "Graham Truesdale"
Post by Graham Truesdale
Post by Don Aitken
Yes. The L of O has been given it, I think, since that office got
statutory recognition in 1937 (although it is rare for one not to have
it already, as an ex-cabinet minister).
The next L of O will be Davis or Cameron
The current one is Howard
Previously Duncan-Smith
Previously Hague
Previously (briefly) Major
Previously Blair
Previously Smith
Previously Kinnock
Previously Foot
How many of those nine had/have/will have Cabinet experience while
LoO?
All of them except Duncan-Smith, Blair and Kinnock (and the current
candidates, I think). Before Kinnock, you have to go back to 1931
(Lansbury). The approach adopted, at least by the Tories, since 1990,
copied from American practice, seems to regard losing one election as
a permanent disqualification - that obviously means you are going to
run out of candidates with cabinet experience much faster.
--
Don Aitken
Mail to the From: address is not read.
To email me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com"
Francois R. Velde
2005-11-19 03:42:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Aitken
The approach adopted, at least by the Tories, since 1990,
copied from American practice, seems to regard losing one election as
a permanent disqualification -
For presidential elections, it depends on the margin of the loss.

Nixon lost the 1960 election, and see what happened in 1968.

Bush lost the 2000 election, and see what happened in 2004 :-) :-) :-)
--
François R. Velde
***@nospam.org (replace by "heraldica")
Heraldica Web Site: http://www.heraldica.org/
Graham Truesdale
2005-11-19 13:33:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Aitken
On Fri, 18 Nov 2005 23:47:38 +0000 (UTC), "Graham Truesdale"
Post by Graham Truesdale
Post by Don Aitken
Yes. The L of O has been given it, I think, since that office got
statutory recognition in 1937 (although it is rare for one not to have
it already, as an ex-cabinet minister).
The next L of O will be Davis or Cameron
The current one is Howard
Previously Duncan-Smith
Previously Hague
Previously (briefly) Major
Previously Blair
Previously Smith
Previously Kinnock
Previously Foot
How many of those nine had/have/will have Cabinet experience while
LoO?
All of them except Duncan-Smith, Blair and Kinnock (and the current
candidates, I think). Before Kinnock, you have to go back to 1931
(Lansbury). The approach adopted, at least by the Tories, since 1990,
copied from American practice, seems to regard losing one election as
a permanent disqualification - that obviously means you are going to
run out of candidates with cabinet experience much faster.
So that will mean that, come the new Tory leader, only three of the last
eight LoO's will have had Cabinet experience (and I don't think Major
was LoO for long). I.e.Howard, Hague and Smith.
Graham Truesdale
2005-11-19 17:14:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graham Truesdale
Post by Don Aitken
On Fri, 18 Nov 2005 23:47:38 +0000 (UTC), "Graham Truesdale"
Post by Graham Truesdale
Post by Don Aitken
Yes. The L of O has been given it, I think, since that office got
statutory recognition in 1937 (although it is rare for one not to have
it already, as an ex-cabinet minister).
The next L of O will be Davis or Cameron
The current one is Howard
Previously Duncan-Smith
Previously Hague
Previously (briefly) Major
Previously Blair
Previously Smith
Previously Kinnock
Previously Foot
How many of those nine had/have/will have Cabinet experience while
LoO?
All of them except Duncan-Smith, Blair and Kinnock (and the current
candidates, I think). Before Kinnock, you have to go back to 1931
(Lansbury). The approach adopted, at least by the Tories, since 1990,
copied from American practice, seems to regard losing one election as
a permanent disqualification - that obviously means you are going to
run out of candidates with cabinet experience much faster.
So that will mean that, come the new Tory leader, only three
Should have been four
Post by Graham Truesdale
of the last
eight LoO's will have had Cabinet experience (and I don't think Major
was LoO for long). I.e.Howard, Hague and Smith.
Graham Truesdale
2005-11-18 23:46:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Rhodes
From the Court Circular, Times, Nov 16: "The Rt Hon and Most Reverend
John Tucker Mugabi Sentamu, Dr Ian Paisley MP, Dame Heather Hallett,
Sir Alan Moses, Sir Stephen Richards and Sir Nicholas Wilson were sworn
in as members of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council."
I see that Sentamu is Reverend while Paisley is not. Is this because the former
is of the Established Church?
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-19 08:53:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Graham Truesdale
Post by Michael Rhodes
From the Court Circular, Times, Nov 16: "The Rt Hon and Most Reverend
John Tucker Mugabi Sentamu, Dr Ian Paisley MP, Dame Heather Hallett,
Sir Alan Moses, Sir Stephen Richards and Sir Nicholas Wilson were sworn
in as members of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council."
I see that Sentamu is Reverend while Paisley is not. Is this because the former
is of the Established Church?
I doubt it. The Archbishop is described as "the Rt Hon", a style which
none of his fellows is accorded for some reason. As you note, Dr
Paisley has his "Revd" similarly omitted, while the Archbishop is
proclaimed to be "Most Reverend". Furthermore, the former of the
Archbishop's styles should precede that which denotes his Privy Council
membership, viz "The Most Revd and Rt Hon." [e.g. see HMSO's 'Honours &
Titles', p 81: the British Government's own guide to styles and
titles].

I am also unclear why the Archbishop has his full range of middle-names
displayed (including Mugabi, which, if it were mine, I might keep quiet
about), but we do not read of Ian Richard Kyle Paisley, nor of Heather
Carol Hallett, nor Sir Alan George Moses, nor Sir Stephen Price
Richards, nor Sir Nicholas Allan Roy Wilson.

I am reminded of the Court Circular for 12 October of which I recently
wrote which announced the admission to the Council of "Mr John
Lawrence, Lord Whitty" - a violation of style that takes the breath
away.

It's the sloppy drafting and inattention to detail or accuracy that's
swiftly becoming a hallmark of the operation of Government in the UK.

MAR
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-19 09:16:10 UTC
Permalink
From the Court Circular, Times, Nov 16: "The Rt Hon and Most Reverend
John Tucker Mugabi Sentamu, Dr Ian Paisley MP, Dame Heather Hallett,
Sir Alan Moses, Sir Stephen Richards and Sir Nicholas Wilson were sworn
in as members of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council."
Sir Nicholas Wilson, QC, aka the Hon. Mr Justice Wilson, has a
well-connected bloodline.

He is the son of Roderick Wilson and Dorothy Anne Chenevix-Trench (b
1916), daughter of Col. Arthur Chenevix-Trench, CIE (1884-1968), son of
the Revd Herbert Chenevix-Trench (1850-1900), son of Archbishop Trench
(1807-1886), nephew of the 1st Baron Ashtown.

MAR
Peter Tilman
2005-11-19 09:31:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@btinternet.com
From the Court Circular, Times, Nov 16: "The Rt Hon and Most Reverend
John Tucker Mugabi Sentamu, Dr Ian Paisley MP, Dame Heather Hallett,
Sir Alan Moses, Sir Stephen Richards and Sir Nicholas Wilson were sworn
in as members of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council."
Sir Nicholas Wilson, QC, aka the Hon. Mr Justice Wilson, has a
well-connected bloodline.
He's now Lord Justice Wilson (hence the appointment to the Privy Council).
Francois R. Velde
2005-11-19 18:15:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@btinternet.com
I am reminded of the Court Circular for 12 October of which I recently
wrote which announced the admission to the Council of "Mr John
Lawrence, Lord Whitty" - a violation of style that takes the breath
away.
It's the sloppy drafting and inattention to detail or accuracy that's
swiftly becoming a hallmark of the operation of Government in the UK.
Is the Court Circular produced by Government in the UK? I thought it came out
of BP. Where, exactly, is it produced?
--
François Velde
***@nospam.org (replace by "heraldica")
Heraldry Site: http://www.heraldica.org/
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-19 18:23:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Francois R. Velde
Post by m***@btinternet.com
I am reminded of the Court Circular for 12 October of which I recently
wrote which announced the admission to the Council of "Mr John
Lawrence, Lord Whitty" - a violation of style that takes the breath
away.
It's the sloppy drafting and inattention to detail or accuracy that's
swiftly becoming a hallmark of the operation of Government in the UK.
Is the Court Circular produced by Government in the UK? I thought it came out
of BP. Where, exactly, is it produced?
So far as I know, it comes out of Buckingham Palace, as you say, which
is where HM has her Offices. Last time I looked, the Queen was part of
the Government in the UK.

MAR
Gary Holtzman
2005-11-19 23:12:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@btinternet.com
So far as I know, it comes out of Buckingham Palace, as you say, which
is where HM has her Offices. Last time I looked, the Queen was part of
the Government in the UK.
The "Government" in the UK is the Prime Minister and his/her cabinet, along with their
parliamentary supporters. The Queen is most certainly not a part of it.
--
Gary Holtzman

Change "macnospam.com" to "mac.com" to email.

-------------------- http://NewsReader.Com/ --------------------
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-19 23:30:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gary Holtzman
Post by m***@btinternet.com
So far as I know, it comes out of Buckingham Palace, as you say, which
is where HM has her Offices. Last time I looked, the Queen was part of
the Government in the UK.
The "Government" in the UK is the Prime Minister and his/her cabinet, along with their
parliamentary supporters. The Queen is most certainly not a part of it.
Aren't semantics fun! You have given one definition of "Government".
Here is another:

"the organization, machinery, or agency through which a political unit
exercises authority and performs functions and which is usually
classified according to the distribution of power within it; the
complex of political institutions, laws, and customs through which the
function of governing is carried out"

Would you care to assert that HM plays no role in governing the
country?

I was not attacking either the Queen or her current Ministers in my
original observation: standards of accuracy from official sources that
one would expect to know better (the Queen's private office; the Privy
Council; 10 Downing Street; the BBC &c &c) are often lower than
formerly or than one would expect. I stand by that observation.

Cheers, Michael
Don Aitken
2005-11-19 23:18:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@btinternet.com
Post by Francois R. Velde
Post by m***@btinternet.com
I am reminded of the Court Circular for 12 October of which I recently
wrote which announced the admission to the Council of "Mr John
Lawrence, Lord Whitty" - a violation of style that takes the breath
away.
It's the sloppy drafting and inattention to detail or accuracy that's
swiftly becoming a hallmark of the operation of Government in the UK.
Is the Court Circular produced by Government in the UK? I thought it came out
of BP. Where, exactly, is it produced?
So far as I know, it comes out of Buckingham Palace, as you say, which
is where HM has her Offices. Last time I looked, the Queen was part of
the Government in the UK.
Certainly not. The government is her Majesty's government, but the
opposition is equally Her Majesty's opposition. The term "government"
means the ministers, and those departments and offices they directly
control. The American usage, by which the term "government" is used in
a wider sense, which includes the legislature and the judiciary as
well as the executive, is not used (or,indeed, generally understood)
in the UK.
--
Don Aitken
Mail to the From: address is not read.
To email me, substitute "clara.co.uk" for "freeuk.com"
m***@btinternet.com
2005-11-19 23:45:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Aitken
The government is her Majesty's government, but the
opposition is equally Her Majesty's opposition. The term "government"
means the ministers, and those departments and offices they directly
control. The American usage, by which the term "government" is used in
a wider sense, which includes the legislature and the judiciary as
well as the executive, is not used (or,indeed, generally understood)
in the UK.
"The Crown is the head of the executive power" [Osborn's Concise Legal
Dictionary]. I paid some attention all those years ago when I scraped
through Constitutional Law!

I was not implying that the Queen was part of the Labour Party. I was
stating that she is part of the Government of the UK. I stand by that
self-evident statement:-)

regards MAR
Loading...