Discussion:
What Goes With Sussex?
Add Reply
Louis Epstein
2017-11-28 19:44:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.

British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.

Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.

When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.

Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
fallenstarseven
2017-11-28 19:58:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
I've seen this reported; is it likely based on inside "leaks" from the household? Or is it driven from some notion that Sussex is the only practical choice?

Is there a possibility that new geographical ground could be added to the portfolio of traditional royal dukedoms, a la Wessex? Anybody have any thoughts on what might be a nice choice in that regard?
Post by Louis Epstein
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
Louis Epstein
2017-11-28 20:16:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by fallenstarseven
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
I've seen this reported; is it likely based on inside "leaks" from the
household? Or is it driven from some notion that Sussex is the only
practical choice?
It's based on its being a traditional royal dukedom that hasn't been used
in some time,and is considered less "jinxed" than Clarence (which I want
to see used for George) or Kendal.
Post by fallenstarseven
Is there a possibility that new geographical ground could be added to
the portfolio of traditional royal dukedoms, a la Wessex? Anybody have
any thoughts on what might be a nice choice in that regard?
As far as the rest of the Heptarchy goes,
Mercia goes better as a marquessate for the alliteration,
Northumberland's a long-standing dukedom that would make
Northumbria confusing,
Essex is a long-standing earldom,
Kent is already in use,
and East Anglia would look odd.
Bernicia and Deira would sound odd.
Post by fallenstarseven
Post by Louis Epstein
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Graham
2017-11-28 22:16:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England)
The River Severn rises in Wales.
Louis Epstein
2017-11-28 22:55:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England)
The River Severn rises in Wales.
It would seem more appropriate to grant titles associated with Wales
to sons of a Prince of Wales than to third sons of the Sovereign,
yet Edward got one and William did not?

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Graham
2017-11-28 22:48:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
As a matter of peerage law, can a hereditary peerage with gender-blind succession be created? If so, has it ever happened?
Louis Epstein
2017-11-28 22:53:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
As a matter of peerage law, can a hereditary peerage with
gender-blind succession be created?
Special remainders are not limited in any way I am aware of.
Post by Graham
If so, has it ever happened?
Not yet.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Graham
2017-11-29 18:13:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Louis Epstein
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
As a matter of peerage law, can a hereditary peerage with
gender-blind succession be created?
Special remainders are not limited in any way I am aware of.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remainder_(law)#Special_remainder_in_peerages
(ObFWIW) - " However, in all cases the course of descent specified in the patent must be known in common law. For instance, the Crown may not make a "shifting limitation" in the letters patent; in other words, the patent may not vest the peerage in an individual and then, upon some event other than death (such as succession to a higher title), shift the title to another person. The doctrine was established in the Buckhurst Peerage Case (1876) 2 App Cas 1, in which the House of Lords deemed invalid the letters patent intended to keep the Barony of Buckhurst separate from the Earldom of De La Warr. The patent stipulated that if the holder of the barony should ever inherit the earldom, then he would be deprived of the barony, which would instead pass to the next successor as if the deprived holder had died without issue."
Louis Epstein
2017-11-29 18:51:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
As a matter of peerage law, can a hereditary peerage with
gender-blind succession be created?
Special remainders are not limited in any way I am aware of.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remainder_(law)#Special_remainder_in_peerages
(ObFWIW) - " However, in all cases the course of descent specified in
the patent must be known in common law. For instance, the Crown may not
make a "shifting limitation" in the letters patent; in other words, the
patent may not vest the peerage in an individual and then, upon some
event other than death (such as succession to a higher title), shift the
title to another person. The doctrine was established in the Buckhurst
Peerage Case (1876) 2 App Cas 1, in which the House of Lords deemed
invalid the letters patent intended to keep the Barony of Buckhurst
separate from the Earldom of De La Warr. The patent stipulated that if
the holder of the barony should ever inherit the earldom, then he would
be deprived of the barony, which would instead pass to the next
successor as if the deprived holder had died without issue."
Heirs general without division is definitely a known remainder type;
making it gender-blind would not raise eyebrows now.
Remember,the Wensleydale peerage case refused to seat a peer because
his title was not hereditary,and then an Act was passed to provide for
life peerages...any demurring by the Committee for Privileges could
be met by a statutory fix,but since now hereditary peerages don't
carry automatic Lords seats in the first place,there wouldn't be an
occasion on which acceptance of the remainder was submitted for any
sort of approval.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
The Chief
2017-11-30 16:28:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
As a matter of peerage law, can a hereditary peerage with
gender-blind succession be created?
Special remainders are not limited in any way I am aware of.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remainder_(law)#Special_remainder_in_peerages
(ObFWIW) - " However, in all cases the course of descent specified in the patent must be known in common law. For instance, the Crown may not make a "shifting limitation" in the letters patent; in other words, the patent may not vest the peerage in an individual and then, upon some event other than death (such as succession to a higher title), shift the title to another person. The doctrine was established in the Buckhurst Peerage Case (1876) 2 App Cas 1, in which the House of Lords deemed invalid the letters patent intended to keep the Barony of Buckhurst separate from the Earldom of De La Warr. The patent stipulated that if the holder of the barony should ever inherit the earldom, then he would be deprived of the barony, which would instead pass to the next successor as if the deprived holder had died without issue."
However, the current proposal is to "shift" the pretended "Edinburgh" title from Chuck to Eddie, when Phil kicks the bucket....

Regards,
The Chief
Louis Epstein
2017-12-01 01:51:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by The Chief
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
Post by Graham
Post by Louis Epstein
The presumption is that when HRH Prince Henry of Wales marries,
he will be created HRH The Duke of Sussex.
British royal dukedoms have tended to come with an earldom and a barony,
with the titles distributed one English,one Scottish,and one (Northern)
Irish,viz.
Duke of Gloucester(England),Earl of Ulster(Ireland),Baron Culloden(Scotland)
Duke of Kent(England),Earl of St. Andrews(Scotland),Baron Downpatrick(Ireland)
Duke of Cambridge(England),Earl of Strathearn(Scotland),Baron Carrickfergus(Ireland)
Both George VI and Prince Andrew were created Duke of York(England) and
Earl of Inverness(Scotland),but the former was Baron Killarney and the
latter Baron Killyleagh because Killarney had become part of the Republic.
Prince Edward has been made Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn (both
in England) and is expected to be given a new creation as Duke of
Edinburgh(Scotland),probably all by itself as he already has titles
that can be used for the sons and grandsons of future Dukes...the
current Dukedom is itself a breach of the pattern since its Earldom
is Merioneth(Wales) and Barony Greenwich(England) with nothing Irish.
When Prince Edward got a title out of the Heptarchy I thought it would
be fitting for his nephew to become Marquess of Mercia,but like Sussex
that's in England...as is Sleaford,the place referenced in Baron Hussey
of Sleaford's title forfeited when that ancestor of Meghan Markle was
beheaded on order of Henry VIII.
So those nuances may be out if they want geographical balance.
Also of note is the remainder to the title.
To date all royal dukedoms and associated titles have been created
with remainder to heirs-male (hence Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie
can not inherit the Dukedom of York,and Princess Alexandra can not
inherit the Dukedom of Kent).
With the throne historically passing to heirs general (daughters
allowed if there are no sons),and the Succession to the Crown Act
now on the books letting daughters precede sons,will this STILL
be the case?...or will one of the more inclusive remainders be
chosen?
As a matter of peerage law, can a hereditary peerage with
gender-blind succession be created?
Special remainders are not limited in any way I am aware of.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remainder_(law)#Special_remainder_in_peerages
(ObFWIW) - " However, in all cases the course of descent specified in
the patent must be known in common law. For instance, the Crown may not
make a "shifting limitation" in the letters patent; in other words, the
patent may not vest the peerage in an individual and then, upon some
event other than death (such as succession to a higher title), shift
the title to another person. The doctrine was established in the
Buckhurst Peerage Case (1876) 2 App Cas 1, in which the House of Lords
deemed invalid the letters patent intended to keep the Barony of
Buckhurst separate from the Earldom of De La Warr. The patent stipulated
that if the holder of the barony should ever inherit the earldom, then
he would be deprived of the barony, which would instead pass to the
next successor as if the deprived holder had died without issue."
[note however the operative shifting remainder for the Earldom of
Selkirk]
Post by The Chief
However, the current proposal is to "shift" the pretended "Edinburgh"
title from Chuck to Eddie, when Phil kicks the bucket....
Incorrect.
There is an intent that when the extant (created 1947) Dukedom of
Edinburgh merges in the Crown (on the deaths of both Her Majesty
and Prince Philip) there will then be an entirely new Dukedom of
Edinburgh created for Prince Edward.

As his existing Earldom of Wessex and Viscounty of Severn have
remainder to heirs male giving the Dukedom a different remainder
could be awkward.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

Loading...