Discussion:
Last Letter Of Mary Queen Of Scots On Exhibit
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David Amicus
2017-02-08 22:40:14 UTC
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http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-38907013

Today 8 February is the anniversary of her martyrdom.

I wonder if the cause for her sainthood has been introduced?
Graham
2017-02-10 23:26:17 UTC
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Post by David Amicus
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-38907013
Today 8 February is the anniversary of her martyrdom.
I wonder if the cause for her sainthood has been introduced?
http://www.academia.edu/245325/The_canonisation_of_Mary_Queen_of_Scots - "Although her beatification had the public approval and support of Pope Benedict XV (1914-22), whether for reasons of political sensitivity or simply the absence of miracles, it remained unresolved and was allowed to slip quietly into oblivion."
David Amicus
2017-02-12 18:33:59 UTC
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Post by Graham
Post by David Amicus
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-38907013
Today 8 February is the anniversary of her martyrdom.
I wonder if the cause for her sainthood has been introduced?
http://www.academia.edu/245325/The_canonisation_of_Mary_Queen_of_Scots - "Although her beatification had the public approval and support of Pope Benedict XV (1914-22), whether for reasons of political sensitivity or simply the absence of miracles, it remained unresolved and was allowed to slip quietly into oblivion."
Aren't there miracle exceptions for martyrs?

And though not a martyr I think that Pope Francis waived the miracles for the canonization of Pope John XXIII.


Mary Queen of Scots and rightful Queen of England - pray for us!
Windemere
2017-02-15 16:14:02 UTC
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Post by David Amicus
Post by Graham
Post by David Amicus
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-38907013
Today 8 February is the anniversary of her martyrdom.
I wonder if the cause for her sainthood has been introduced?
http://www.academia.edu/245325/The_canonisation_of_Mary_Queen_of_Scots - "Although her beatification had the public approval and support of Pope Benedict XV (1914-22), whether for reasons of political sensitivity or simply the absence of miracles, it remained unresolved and was allowed to slip quietly into oblivion."
Aren't there miracle exceptions for martyrs?
And though not a martyr I think that Pope Francis waived the miracles for the canonization of Pope John XXIII.
Mary Queen of Scots and rightful Queen of England - pray for us!
It's never been ascertained for sure what level of involvement, if any, Mary had in the assassination of her 1st husband (Henry, Lord Darnley) at Kirk O'Field. I imagine that this might be somewhat of an impediment to her canonization.

Actually,during her reign as Scottish queen, Mary, though Catholic herself, strove to maintain an equitable balance between Catholicism and Calvinistic Protestantism. It wasn't until her long captivity in England that she began to portray herself as a devout Catholic , and this was probably partly for political reasons, in order to retain the support of the French and Spanish monarchs, as well as the English Catholics, who wanted to use her to replace Queen Elizabeth. She was quite circumspect and discreet about it, though. Towards the end, aware that she was to be executed, she then presented herself as a martyr for the Catholic faith.
David Amicus
2017-02-15 18:31:36 UTC
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Post by Windemere
Post by David Amicus
Post by Graham
Post by David Amicus
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-38907013
Today 8 February is the anniversary of her martyrdom.
I wonder if the cause for her sainthood has been introduced?
http://www.academia.edu/245325/The_canonisation_of_Mary_Queen_of_Scots - "Although her beatification had the public approval and support of Pope Benedict XV (1914-22), whether for reasons of political sensitivity or simply the absence of miracles, it remained unresolved and was allowed to slip quietly into oblivion."
Aren't there miracle exceptions for martyrs?
And though not a martyr I think that Pope Francis waived the miracles for the canonization of Pope John XXIII.
Mary Queen of Scots and rightful Queen of England - pray for us!
It's never been ascertained for sure what level of involvement, if any, Mary had in the assassination of her 1st husband (Henry, Lord Darnley) at Kirk O'Field. I imagine that this might be somewhat of an impediment to her canonization.
Actually,during her reign as Scottish queen, Mary, though Catholic herself, strove to maintain an equitable balance between Catholicism and Calvinistic Protestantism. It wasn't until her long captivity in England that she began to portray herself as a devout Catholic , and this was probably partly for political reasons, in order to retain the support of the French and Spanish monarchs, as well as the English Catholics, who wanted to use her to replace Queen Elizabeth. She was quite circumspect and discreet about it, though. Towards the end, aware that she was to be executed, she then presented herself as a martyr for the Catholic faith.
Thank-you
Chuck
2017-02-15 23:18:27 UTC
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Granted, the possible involvement in the murder of Henry Lord Darnley, ythen known as King Henry, would be an impediment to any canonization. But please, do not refer to Darnley as the Queen of Scots first husband. He was her second husband. I have long thought that her life would have been immeasurably better had Mary's first husband had a full life. And if they had consummated that marriage. It was by far the best of her three marriages---which isn't saying much, as her second and third marriages were unmitigated disasters. But she did love King Francis II of France, and from little we know he loved her. She was probably a better Queen of France than Queen of Scots. BTW, I think her innocent of Darnley's murder---her reaction to the news of his death I think acquits her.
Post by Windemere
It's never been ascertained for sure what level of involvement, if any, Mary had in the assassination of her 1st husband (Henry, Lord Darnley) at Kirk O'Field. I imagine that this might be somewhat of an impediment to her canonization.
Actually,during her reign as Scottish queen, Mary, though Catholic herself, strove to maintain an equitable balance between Catholicism and Calvinistic Protestantism. It wasn't until her long captivity in England that she began to portray herself as a devout Catholic , and this was probably partly for political reasons, in order to retain the support of the French and Spanish monarchs, as well as the English Catholics, who wanted to use her to replace Queen Elizabeth. She was quite circumspect and discreet about it, though. Towards the end, aware that she was to be executed, she then presented herself as a martyr for the Catholic faith.
Windemere
2017-02-16 20:22:37 UTC
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Post by Chuck
Granted, the possible involvement in the murder of Henry Lord Darnley, ythen known as King Henry, would be an impediment to any canonization. But please, do not refer to Darnley as the Queen of Scots first husband. He was her second husband. I have long thought that her life would have been immeasurably better had Mary's first husband had a full life. And if they had consummated that marriage. It was by far the best of her three marriages---which isn't saying much, as her second and third marriages were unmitigated disasters. But she did love King Francis II of France, and from little we know he loved her. She was probably a better Queen of France than Queen of Scots. BTW, I think her innocent of Darnley's murder---her reaction to the news of his death I think acquits her.
Thanks for that information. I'd forgotten about Mary's earlier marriage to the young king of France.
Post by Chuck
Post by Windemere
It's never been ascertained for sure what level of involvement, if any, Mary had in the assassination of her 1st husband (Henry, Lord Darnley) at Kirk O'Field. I imagine that this might be somewhat of an impediment to her canonization.
Actually,during her reign as Scottish queen, Mary, though Catholic herself, strove to maintain an equitable balance between Catholicism and Calvinistic Protestantism. It wasn't until her long captivity in England that she began to portray herself as a devout Catholic , and this was probably partly for political reasons, in order to retain the support of the French and Spanish monarchs, as well as the English Catholics, who wanted to use her to replace Queen Elizabeth. She was quite circumspect and discreet about it, though. Towards the end, aware that she was to be executed, she then presented herself as a martyr for the Catholic faith.
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