Discussion:
Why Maria Luigia and not Maria Ludovica?
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D***@teikyopost.edu
2017-06-17 13:25:46 UTC
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there is a copy of the decree, published on 29 February 1816, stating
her decision that her title must be:

Sua Maestà la Principessa Imperiale ed Arciduchessa d'Austria MARIA
LUIGIA, Duchessa di Parma, Piacenza e Guastalla [Her Majesty the
Imperial Princess and Archduchess of Austria MARIA LUIGIA, Duchess of
Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla]

Since her name was "Maria Ludovica," why did she decide to use Luigia
instead of Ludovica, a perfectly acceptable Italian name?
Count Gudenus
2017-06-17 18:32:51 UTC
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Le samedi 17 juin 2017 15:25:47 UTC+2, ***@teikyopost.edu a écrit :
Perhaps you should state first a short remark concernin Napoleon and her
D***@teikyopost.edu
2017-06-18 15:22:05 UTC
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Post by Count Gudenus
Perhaps you should state first a short remark concernin Napoleon and her
Maria Ludovica should have fiercely opposed Napoleon's decision to
give their son the title "King of Rome" (Roi de Rome).

Napoleon made an incredibly colossal blunder when he saddled his son
with such a highly inappropriate title, which had been proscribed for
23 centuries.

Livy states that after the expulsion of Tarquinius Superbus: "His
[Lucius Junius Brutus'] first act was to make the people, while the
state of liberty was still fresh upon their tongues, swear a solemn
oath never to allow any man to be king in Rome, hoping by this means
to forestall future attempts by persuation or bribery to restore the
monarchy." [Aubrey de Selincourt, "Livy: The History of Early Rome,"
The Heritage Press, New York (1972) p. 100]
Count Gudenus
2017-06-19 07:15:03 UTC
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be clear! Still wife of ...?
Louis Epstein
2017-06-20 04:17:41 UTC
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Post by D***@teikyopost.edu
Post by Count Gudenus
Perhaps you should state first a short remark concernin Napoleon and her
Maria Ludovica should have fiercely opposed Napoleon's decision to
give their son the title "King of Rome" (Roi de Rome).
Napoleon made an incredibly colossal blunder when he saddled his son
with such a highly inappropriate title, which had been proscribed for
23 centuries.
Livy states that after the expulsion of Tarquinius Superbus: "His
[Lucius Junius Brutus'] first act was to make the people, while the
state of liberty was still fresh upon their tongues, swear a solemn
oath never to allow any man to be king in Rome, hoping by this means
to forestall future attempts by persuation or bribery to restore the
monarchy." [Aubrey de Selincourt, "Livy: The History of Early Rome,"
The Heritage Press, New York (1972) p. 100]
An attitude all monarchists should condemn.

Besides,"King of the Romans" had been used for centuries as the
title for the heir apparent to the Holy Roman Empire.

-=-=-
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