Discussion:
Arise Sir Andy, Dude of Dunblane
(too old to reply)
hihgdm
2016-12-31 13:26:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Perhaps the Dudedom will come next time. I'm sure the Queen was happy to agree to this, as well as for Mo Farah, Jessica Ennis Hill and others
Louis Epstein
2016-12-31 21:54:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by hihgdm
Perhaps the Dudedom will come next time. I'm sure the Queen was happy
to agree to this, as well as for Mo Farah, Jessica Ennis Hill and others
Knighthood for a yet-to-retire athlete sounds wrong,
though the insult of being called a "dude" is worse.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
hihgdm
2017-01-01 15:37:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Louis Epstein
Post by hihgdm
Perhaps the Dudedom will come next time. I'm sure the Queen was happy
to agree to this, as well as for Mo Farah, Jessica Ennis Hill and others
Knighthood for a yet-to-retire athlete sounds wrong,
though the insult of being called a "dude" is worse.
Don't blame me Comrade, Prince Harry made dudedom acceptable. Perhaps the real reason for one's tantrum is that one missed out on a gong, yet again? I have one word for you Comrade - philanthropy...or perhaps sports prowess.
c***@hush.ai
2017-01-01 16:31:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Louis Epstein
Knighthood for a yet-to-retire athlete sounds wrong,
though the insult of being called a "dude" is worse.
Knighthood was intended for active service soldiers - and a lot of kings have subverted it by knighting princes at overly young ages, when they were not realistically expected to stand up to adult petty noble knights in hand to hand fighting. As one notorious example, and by no means the youngest, orphaned Henry III was knighted age 9, after his father´s death but before his coronation. Not by himself either. By which or whose authority did William Marshal make King a knight?

Anyway: if in peacetime a squire may be fairly dubbed a knight for being a champion at tournaments, what´s wrong for knighting an active athlete, generally?
Louis Epstein
2017-01-01 21:20:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by c***@hush.ai
Post by Louis Epstein
Knighthood for a yet-to-retire athlete sounds wrong,
though the insult of being called a "dude" is worse.
Knighthood was intended for active service soldiers - and a lot of
kings have subverted it by knighting princes at overly young ages, when
they were not realistically expected to stand up to adult petty noble
knights in hand to hand fighting. As one notorious example, and by no means the youngest,
As the Prince of Wales is inherently a Knight of the Garter,I suppose Edward VII
became a knight aged 30 days...
Post by c***@hush.ai
orphaned Henry III was knighted age 9, after his father??s death but before his coronation.
Not by himself either. By which or whose authority did William Marshal make King a knight?
That of his office or his feudal status I suppose...
Post by c***@hush.ai
Anyway: if in peacetime a squire may be fairly dubbed a knight for being a champion at
tournaments, what??s wrong for knighting an active athlete, generally?
These days knighthood is given to general officers,not soldiers or sailors in the field...
the Director General of the Defence Safety Authority,for example,got a KBE in the 2017
New Year Honours.

Stanley Matthews and Tom Finney were knighted long after hanging up their boots,
Lord Coe got a lower level decoration while still competing...

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
c***@hush.ai
2017-01-03 21:29:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by c***@hush.ai
Knighthood was intended for active service soldiers - and a lot of
kings have subverted it by knighting princes at overly young ages, when
they were not realistically expected to stand up to adult petty noble
knights in hand to hand fighting. As one notorious example, and by no means > > the youngest,
As the Prince of Wales is inherently a Knight of the Garter,I suppose Edward > VII became a knight aged 30 days...
Post by c***@hush.ai
orphaned Henry III was knighted age 9, after his father??s death but before > > his coronation.
Not by himself either. By which or whose authority did William Marshal make > > King a knight?
That of his office or his feudal status I suppose...
The statutes of Garter required that a member had to be a knight (bachelor) already. Though some founding members were dubbed in the same year as admission of Garter - but as separate and previous act.
The Garter would have run into problems in 1376, when the 9 year old Richard of Bordeaux was orphaned. He was made Prince of Wales with some urgency. Yet Henry III had been even younger when knighted.
Was Richard of Bordeaux dubbed a knight bachelor by some separate act in 1376?
Donald4564
2017-01-01 19:59:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by hihgdm
Perhaps the Dudedom will come next time. I'm sure the Queen was happy to agree to this, as well as for Mo Farah, Jessica Ennis Hill and others
Well I'm pleased that Doddy* got one and am wondering whether he will be taking along his tickling stick to the investiture. At least at 89 he is still alive to eventually receive it.

Regards
Donald Binks

* (Sir Ken Dodd)
Loading...