Discussion:
Pactum Serva
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David Amicus
2018-05-25 00:46:20 UTC
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I've been reading online about King Edward I of England. I found out that his motto was PACTUM SERVA.

I read two different translations for it "Keep the Faith" and "Keep the Vow". Which is the correct one or is there a better translation?
n***@gmail.com
2018-05-26 01:18:45 UTC
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Post by David Amicus
I've been reading online about King Edward I of England. I found out that his motto was PACTUM SERVA.
I read two different translations for it "Keep the Faith" and "Keep the Vow". Which is the correct one or is there a better translation?
Serva is the imperative of servo/servire which means to keep or preserve. Pactum is an adjective that means agreed/stipulated/etc. So "pactum serva" is an order preserve something that was agreed.

So "keep the vow" is a more literal translation. If you are in come sort of culture which describes it's faith as a vow "keep the faith" would work to.

Nick
David Amicus
2018-05-26 03:21:18 UTC
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Post by n***@gmail.com
Post by David Amicus
I've been reading online about King Edward I of England. I found out that his motto was PACTUM SERVA.
I read two different translations for it "Keep the Faith" and "Keep the Vow". Which is the correct one or is there a better translation?
Serva is the imperative of servo/servire which means to keep or preserve. Pactum is an adjective that means agreed/stipulated/etc. So "pactum serva" is an order preserve something that was agreed.
So "keep the vow" is a more literal translation. If you are in come sort of culture which describes it's faith as a vow "keep the faith" would work to.
Nick
Thanks!

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